Jan 28, 2010

How Will We Age In The Future?

As a society we are obsessed by many things; two of them being immortality and youth. We want a legacy, a way to leave our mark on the world, so that even if our bodies can't live forever then possibly our names will. We are also obsessed with looking "ten years younger." Sorry, but appearing to be 18 doesn't really appeal to me. We firm, tighten, iron, color, and camouflage. If people assume we are younger we are flattered, if they assume we are older we're insulted. Youth are not taken seriously but our obsession with appearing youthful is a noble pursuit. Instead of being encouraged to enjoy our life at whatever age we happen to be living it, we are told to grow up or stop being an old fogie. We are given a 10-20 year span of optimal living experiences when society has accepted one as old enough to be mature yet young enough to avoid senility. Wisdom is underrated unless it is perfectly paired with beauty.

And if you are nodding your head trying to agree with me, think about all the things you do to mask your age. Whether we are trying to look older or younger everyone seems primarily interested in concealing something about themselves.

So, the question is, if you could live forever, would you?

It is easy for me to have little desire for this initially. But I start becoming seduced by a life long enough to read all the books I want and learn all the things that interest me. But, if I did in fact have more time to accomplish all this would I just squander it? When you have all the time in the world, that makes this moment count?

2 comments:

  1. I enjoyed being in my 20's but couldn't wait to turn 30. I'm astounded by all my former classmates who boo-hoo each birthday now that they're no longer in their 20's. I intend to enjoy each and every one of them--and no, I have no desire to live forever. To 100, maybe, depending on how my body ages.

    I knew a woman who turned 100, still lived on her own in her own house and had a great attitude, getting out and enjoying everything she could. (One night--at, like, midnight--when she was 99, we helped her hook up a new iMac. It was great. She had more energy than I did.) I want to be like her when I'm technically old.

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  2. Love this post. Forever is a heck of a long time. I can't even begin to imagine forever, and I'm only 18. But I can't imagine not existing, either. You have to have death to have life, so I wouldn't end death if I had the choice. Because that means ending life.

    That's why I like reading books. You can experience these kind of things without actually experiencing them. That's what appealed to me about The Declaration. Interesting to think about...

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